Reviews

Baskerville: A Sherlock Holmes Mystery‘ at Greenbelt Arts Center

WATCH Nominated for “Outstanding Costume Design in a Play”

What you will find instead is a hilarious whodunit featuring a cast of five playing some 42 characters, featuring costume changes at the drop of the hat.

Andy Arnold, DC Metro Theater Arts

The costumes are wonderful – and amazingly complex for such rapid changes.

Rachel Zirkin Duda, Theatre Bloom

The Crucible‘ at Silver Spring Stage

WATCH Nominated for “Outstanding Costume Design in a Play”

Sporting a platinum-white, colonial man-wig, thanks to Costume and Hair Designer Maria Bissex, Hurlbut’s dictatorial voice and icy stare made Danforth a blustering villain.

Bissex’s costume design included impressive vests and buckled Colonial pilgrim shoes for the men, and white bonnets for the women.

William Powell, DC Metro Theater Arts

Godspell‘ at NextStop Theatre

When Jesus arrives on the scene, the colorful costumes come out as this group of bitter moderns is transformed into a gaggle of disciples. But there are no clown wigs or Superman T-shirts (the Wonder Woman top donned by Chani Wereley is nice wink at both that traditional outfit and at how times are changing) — costume designer Maria Bissex keeps the original’s sartorial spirit with whimsical selections that don’t go so far as to look like a kindergarten Halloween parade.

Peter Orvetti, MD Theatre Guide

‘Crazy Mary Lincoln’ at Pallas Theatre Collective

Capping off the aesthetic wonders of the production, Costume Designer Maria Bissex captures the essence of post-assassination union in ensemble garments and Lincoln family garb alike. Signature blacks for Mrs. Lincoln and Robert too, as they were the styles of the times; Bissex’ bonnets are beautiful and her tailoring fit of the costumes to each individual actor is well worthy of praise.

Amanda N. Gunter, Theatre Bloom

Major kudos to costume designer Maria Bissex Costumes for her wide selection of women’s bonnets, men’s hats, press dresses befitting all social classes and shoes to match.

David Sigel, DC Metro Theatre Arts